Fauna of the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range by Evelyn L. Bull

Cover of: Fauna of the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range | Evelyn L. Bull

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Or .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Zoology -- Oregon -- Starkey Experimental Forest and Range.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementEvelyn L. Bull and Michael J. Wisdom.
SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- GTR-291., General technical report PNW -- 291.
ContributionsWisdom, Michael J., Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
The Physical Object
Pagination28 p. :
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15178316M

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Fauna, their seasonal occurrence, and their relative abun-dance. This paper provides a summary of such inf ormation. The Study Area Climate, physiography, soils, and vegetation of the area were described by Strickler ( 1 -2) as follows: The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range is located in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, 30 miles.

Get this from a library. Fauna of the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range. [Evelyn L Bull; Michael J Wisdom; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)]. The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range is a unique facility with a rich history.

The first research emphasized the improvement of rangelands and livestock grazing methods. The setting is ecologically similar to the interior western forest landscapes. The history of use, logging, and grazing is also typical. An illustration of an open book. Books.

An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. A guide to the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range near La Grande, Oregon Item Preview remove-circlePages: The Starkey Project: History Facilities, and Data Collection Methods for Ungulate Research Volume of General technical report PNW: Contributors: Mary M.

Rowland, Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.) Publisher: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Original from: University of. Title. Seasonal forage use by deer and elk on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, Oregon.

Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper PNW ; By. Edgerton, Paul J. Smith, Justin G. (Justin Gardner), Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.).

Background. The Starkey Project is a joint wildlife research project conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, 28 miles southwest of La Grande, Oregon.

Dyrness ). Bull and Wisdom () list fauna of the area. The Starkey Research Project Inthe Starkey Experimental Forest and Range changed dramatically, when ab acres of the research area were enclosed by an 8-foot New Zealand fence (fig.

2).’ Additional fencing subdivided the area into three parts: the main study. These range from the effects of fire exclusion on forest and rangeland structure and composition through modern tree care and vegetation control. Innovative experimental designs, such as the use of paired watersheds to understand the effects of forest management on water quality and quantity, were developed on USDA Forest Service Experimental.

A first-class U.S. Forest Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife research facility, the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range is a 28,acre enclosure of forests and mountain meadows in Oregon’s Blue d off Oregonsouthwest of La Grande, twenty-seven miles of eight-foot high, woven-wire fence encloses most of the present-day forest.

Seasonal forage use by deer and elk on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, Oregon by Edgerton, Paul J. cn; Smith, Justin G. (Justin Gardner), ; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) cn.

At the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, in northeastern Oregon, water development has been one of the key factors in ob- taining proper distribution of cat- tle over the range. During the period, water Fauna of the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range book ment increased in mm&r from 9 to Development Procedure.

This work presents an exploratory data analysis of the trajectories of deer and elk moving about in the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in eastern Oregon. The animals’ movements may be affected by habitat variables and the behavior of the other animals.

Seasonal forage use by deer and elk on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, Oregon (USDA Forest Service research paper PNW) [Paul J Edgerton]. Get this from a library. Seasonal forage use by deer and elk on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, Oregon.

[Paul J Edgerton; Justin G Smith; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)]. years from the United States Forest Service Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Starkey) in northeastern Oregon (Rowland et al.

We fit periodic functions to hourly use of habitat variables to quantify daily and seasonal patterns of movement and habitat use of the 2 species. Specifical-ly, we were interested in identifying the. Chap The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range: Long-Term Research to meet the needs of Managers.- Chapter Evolution of a Short-Term Study of Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe Vectors that turned Into a Long-Term Study of the Remarkable Gray Jay on the Fraser Experimental Forest, Co, Chapter These four issues became the foundation of the Starkey Project's studies that began in and ended during the mid-to late s at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Starkey) and the.

Fifty Years of Research Progress: A Historical Document on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range [Skovlin, Jon M.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Fifty Years of Research Progress: A Historical Document on the Starkey Experimental Forest and RangeAuthor: Jon M. Skovlin. Between andwe obtained global positioning system locations for 42 adult female deer at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in northeast Oregon, USA, during 5‐day control and treatment periods in which hunters were absent (pre‐hunt), present but not actively hunting (scout and post‐hunt), and actively hunting male mule.

We evaluated effects of an experimental fuels reduction program on elk, mule deer, and their habitat at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Starkey) in northeastern Oregon.

The problem of interest this work presents is the description of the movement of free-ranging animals. In particular, the paths of radio-collared Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) moving in the ha.

Starkey Experimental Forest are studied. The details of the experiment are provided in Rowland et al. We conducted research from through on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (hereafter Starkey, 45°12′N, °3′W) operated by the US Forest Service.

Starkey is situated in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington, with elevations ranging from to m (Stewart et al.). LA GRANDE -- Biologists buttoned up the lonesome Starkey Experimental Forest and Range for the winter Saturday, banishing the public from the large fenced wildlife research enclosure until May 1.

cows at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range Station (Starkey), near LaGrande, Oregon. From zero to 14 days from birth, each calf was measured and evaluated one to 14 times (n = total measurements).

Day zero was the calf’s birthday. Not every calf was measured every day creating missing values in the data set. Experimental Site and Procedure The study was conducted on a portion of the Starkey Range described by Holechek et al.

Intwo ha pastures were established on a range having common grazing history. The vegetation and terrain of the two pastures was similar.

Vegetation. Figure 1 -Construction of the game-proof fence at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range enclosed the native herds of mule deer and elk, which became the experimental population. A combination of certain features makes the Starkey Project exceptional in the realm of wildlife research: l.

Yet little was known about how these animals respond to forest and range management until research began in the s at the Starkey Experimental Forest in northeastern Oregon.

Below is a news release from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Statewide winter survival of radio-collared mule deer fawns and elk calves was above average through the end of March, and Fish and Game officials are optimistic that those numbers will continue on their current trajectory through the end of the monitoring period on June 1.

Starkey Experimental Forest and Range opens to public The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range opened to public entry today, once again allowing dispersed recreational activities, including camping and hunting. Post Date. National Forests. As part of this e ort, the Starkey Project was initiated in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon within the ha fenced area of the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Rowland et al.

Locations of elk, deer and cattle were continuously monitored for a year. We illustrate the NB RSPF using 4, locations from 10 GPS‐collared Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) in the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (hereafter Starkey), the site of long‐term ungulate research within a landscape‐scale enclosure of ha (Wisdom et al.

) in northeastern Oregon, USA. This research was conducted. On the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in northeastern Oregon, we studied the effects of different sizes of elk populations on their habitats and foods available.

We also examined the corresponding changes in body condition and pregnancy rates of those elk. Chapter 9. Development of the Selection System in Northern Hardwood Forests: An 80 Year Research Legacy with Impacts across Borders.- Part IV. Research Trajectories in Wildlife, Fauna, Insects.- Chap The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range: Long-Term Research to meet the needs of Managers.- Chapter   D Starkey Exp Forest One Bull Elk Oregon I've never hunted the exp forrest but i do hunt the starkey unit.

I've heard there are some nice trophy animals inside the fence. but its considered high fence hunting so you cannot enter the animal into B&C or P&Y books. Starkey Experimental Forest Enclosure: Closed to all public entry Nov.

15 - April Spring Creek Winter Range (Starkey Unit): Closed to all motor vehicle use Dec. 15 - April McCarty Winter Range (Starkey Unit): Closed to all motor vehicle use Dec. 15 - March Contact: Michelle Dennehy Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 38 slides; includes Starkey Experimental Forest and Range, scenic views, buildings, a mineral spring, and lily pads.

Box-Folder Koosah Falls, Sahalie Falls, and Clear Lake, Add to Shelf 48 slides; also includes slides of Tamolitch Falls, McKenzie Pass, Proxy Falls, Mt. Washington, and Ice Crystals at Fish Lake. We conducted research at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in northeastern Oregon, USA (hereafter Starkey; 45°13‘ N, ° 31‘ W).

Starkey encompasses km 2 and is managed by the United States Forest Service. Elevations at Starkey range from 1, to 1, m a.s.l.

Vegetation is a mosaic of forest stands and open areas. National Preserve in California and the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in Oregon A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Science by Afton F.

Timmins Dr. Kelley Stewart, Thesis Advisor Dr. The Starkey Experimental Forest and Range is a one-of-a-kind, world class research facility, used by scientists from around the world, and is the primary field location for the study of the effects of deer, elk, and cattle on ecosystems.

Interactions between cattle. The study site consisted of two pastures ( and ha) that were split on the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range 34 km west of La Grande, Oregon (°W °N).

These pastures are composed of four plant communities: dry meadows, Douglas fir/oceanspray, Douglas fir elk sedge, and grand fir/pinegrass.On the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in northeastern Oregon, University of Nevada, Reno scientist Kelley Stewart and her team studied the effects of different sizes of elk populations on their habitats and foods available.

They also examined the corresponding changes in body condition and pregnancy rates of those elk. Books; Beer/Drinks; deer, big horn sheep and exotic deer – animals known as “ruminants” because of their multi-chambered stomachs. the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range .

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